Image: michaelharrison.org.uk

By CHUKWUDERA EZE

Catalonia’s secessionist leader, Carles Puigdemont came under intense pressure on Monday to abandon plans to declare independence from Spain after hundreds of thousands of unionists took to the streets at the weekend to protest against the region breaking away.

The referendum and its aftermath have plunged Spain into its worst constitutional crisis in decades, and are a political test for Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, a conservative who has taken a hard line stance on the issue.

Under Catalonia’s referendum law, deemed unconstitutional by Madrid, a vote for independence on Tuesday would start a six-month process that would envisage divorce talks with Spain before regional elections and a final act of separation.

But the Spanish government, buoyed by Sunday’s protests in Barcelona, the Catalan capital, made it clear on Monday it would respond immediately to any such vote.

“I‘m calling on the sensible people in the Catalan government…don’t jump off the edge because you’ll take the people with you,” Spanish Deputy Prime Minister, Soraya Saenz de Santamaría, said in an interview with COPE radio station.

“If there is a unilateral declaration of independence, there will be decisions made to restore law and democracy.”

Spanish Prime Minister, Mariano Rajoy, has not ruled out removing Catalonia’s government and calling new regional elections if it claims independence.

The stakes are high for Spain as it faces its biggest political crisis since it became a democracy four decades ago.

Losing Catalonia, which has its own language and culture, would deprive Spain of a fifth of its economic output and more than a quarter of exports.

A stream of Catalonia- based firms and banks have moved their legal bases outside the region. The crisis has also reopened old divisions in a nation where fascism is a living memory easily revived by strong displays of nationalism.

Author: Cerebral Lemon