Image: www.huffingtonpost.co.uk

Image: www.huffingtonpost.co.uk

Do you come down with an illness after flying? You are not alone.

About 20 per cent of air travelers develop symptoms of common cold within one week of travel.

Most people who have phobia for flying develop it out of the fear of flight sickness rather than the fear of crash.

If your work requires regular air travel or you know someone whose work does, then you might need to pay attention to this.

It is important to demystify the claim that the air in the plane is recycled hence travelers could contract airborne sicknesses.

The air in the plane is recycled every 20 minutes per hour of flight.

Air drawn into the aeroplane cabin from outside is passed through compressor stages. This facility basically compresses the thin and cold air from outside until it is at the same pressure with the air inside the cabin.

The process of air compression heats up the air and there is a need for cooling before it is conducted into the cabin, through High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters which removes a minimum of 99.9 per cent of airborne particulates, bacteria and viruses.

With this, there is a very slim chance of getting infectious airborne sickness.

This is not to say, however, that one cannot take precautions like carrying sanitisers when flying, as there will still be contact with persons and objects.

Contrary to the recycled air myth, people get air sickness after each flight due to anxiety, tiredness, dehydration, cramps and so on. Many things can contribute to air sickness, though. And if one is already having flu, it could get worse.

It is important to make sure that you are well hydrated before the flight. It is a good idea to increase the amount of water you drink 24 to 48 hours before your trip.

Also, wear loose comfortable clothes. Anything constricting, especially around the throat or waist, is sure to make you feel uncomfortable.

You should always try to book your seat at the mid centre of the plane, because the rear of the plane has the bumpiest ride and is by far the worst area for those vulnerable to air sickness.

Excerpts from http://www.motion-sickness-guru.com/

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Author: Dotun Obatuyi

My name is Dotun Obatuyi (Dotunoba), I hail from Osun state, a public health scientist (monitoring and evaluation specialist), my keen interests are researching, critiquing and writing feature articles on health, science and technology as well as issues around the globe.