Let me start by looking at the world from a much broader perspective, then to experiencing some waves, splashes and ripples and finally to the great water through the Atlantic Road.

Our final destination is not that far, but our stopovers might keep us on the road for much longer than normal. But not to worry, as your trip guide, I’ve got a good sense of direction.

First stop:

PREACHER’S PULPIT

When you’re on this pulpit, you’re bound to see the world from a broader perspective.

Preacher’s Pulpit or Pulpit Rock (locally called Preikestolen or Prekestolen) is a famous tourist attraction in the municipality of Forsand in Rogaland county, Norway.

Preikestolen is a steep cliff which rises 604 metres (1,982 ft) above the Lysefjorden. Atop the cliff, there is an almost flat top of approximately 25 by 25 metres (82 ft. × 82 ft.). It sits on the north side of the fjord, opposite the Kjerag plateau, located on the south side.

Tourism at the site has been increasing in recent years, with between 150,000 and 200,000 visitors in 2012, making it one of the most visited natural tourist attractions in Norway.

BASE jumpers often leap from the cliff. Due to its increased popularity, there is currently a project under way to improve the path to the site, which is only accessible via a 3.8-kilometre (2.4 mi) long hike.

GEIRANGER FJORD

The Geiranger Fjord (Norwegian: Geirangerfjorden) is a fjord in the Sunnmøre region of Møre og Romsdal county, Norway.

It is located entirely in the Stranda Municipality. It is a 15-kilometre (9.3 mi) – long branch off the Sunnylvsfjorden, which is a branch off the Storfjorden (Great Fjord). The small village of Geiranger is located at the end of the fjord where the Geirangelva river empties into it.

The fjord is one of Norway’s most visited tourist sites. In 2005, it was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, jointly with the Nærøyfjorden, although this status is now threatened by the disputed plans to build power lines across the fjord.

A car ferry, which doubles as a sightseeing trip, is operated by Fjord1 Nordvestlandske. It runs lengthwise along the fjord between the small towns of Geiranger and Hellesylt.

Along the fjord’s sides, there lie a number of now-abandoned farms. Some restoration has been made by the Storfjordens venner association.

The most commonly visited among these are Skageflå, Knivsflå, and Blomberg. Skageflå may also be reached on foot from Geiranger, while the others require a boat excursion.

The fjord is also host to several impressive waterfalls such as Seven Sisters Falls.

Its Waterfalls and The Rock Slides

The two most notable waterfalls in the Geiranger Fjord are Seven Sister Falls and the Suitor (also called The Friar). Both falls face one another across the fjord, and the Suitor is said to be trying to woo the sisters opposite.

The Bridal Veil is another waterfall in the fjord, so named because it falls delicately over one rocky edge, and when seen backlit by the sun it has the appearance of a thin veil over the rocks.

The Geiranger Fjord is under constant threat from the mountain Åkerneset which is about to erode into the fjord. A collapse would produce a tsunami, hitting several nearby towns including Geiranger and Hellesylt in about ten minutes.

ATLANTIC OCEAN ROAD

The Atlantic Ocean Road or the Atlantic Road (Norwegian: Atlanterhavsveien) is an 8.3-kilometer (5.2 mi) long section of County Road 64 that runs through an archipelago in Eide and Averøy in Møre og Romsdal, Norway.

It passes by Hustadvika, an unsheltered part of the Norwegian Sea, connecting the island of Averøy with the mainland and Romsdalshalvøya peninsula.

It runs between the villages of Kårvåg on Averøy and Vevang in Eida. It is built on several small islands and skerries, which are connected by several causeways, viaducts and eight bridges – the most prominent being Storseisundet Bridge.

The route was originally proposed as a railway line in the early 20th century, but this was abandoned. Serious planning of the road started in the 1970s, and construction started on 1 August 1983. During construction the area was hit by 12 European windstorms.

The road was opened on 7 July 1989, having cost 122 million Norwegian krone (NOK), of which 25 per cent was financed with tolls and the rest from public grants. Collection of tolls was scheduled to run for 15 years, but by June 1999 the road was paid off and the toll removed. The road is preserved as a cultural heritage site and is classified as a National Tourist Route.

It is a popular site to film automotive commercials, has been declared the world’s best road trip, and been awarded the title as “Norwegian Construction of the Century”.

In 2009, the Atlantic Ocean Tunnel opened from Averøy to Kristiansund; together they form a second fixed link between Kristiansund and Molde.

If you’ll visit Norway soon or later, your trip will be incomplete without visiting these three places.

Author: Taofeek Ayeyemi