Source: www.wired.com

Source: www.wired.com

Most shows are for entertainment. But despite the percentage of humor or drama or whatever entertainment there is in most shows, there is most often than not a lesson to be learnt. However, these lessons are easily lost when we focus on the suspense in series.

‘The Good Wife’ is an American television legal and political drama series set in Chicago. It started in 2009 and just ended May 2016.

Produced by couple Robert and Michelle King, it features Hollywood actors that have over the years been awarded for their splendid roles in the show. This include the main character – the “Good wife”, Julian Margulies as Alicia Florrick. Also starring in the movie were Josh Charles, Christine Baranski amongst others.

The series which has won numerous awards was inspired by a prostitution scandal in the US known as the Eliot Spitzer prostitution scandal as well as other prominent American political sex scandal.

The movie featured Alicia, the main character who has been a homemaker for 13 years going back to work as a lawyer to provide for her children after Husband – State’s attorney was jailed for corruption and sex scandals.

Over the 7 seasons, Good wife fans witnessed the transformation of Alicia from a meek, ready to please first year attorney to a cunning liberated, intelligent firm owner.

One of the most important lessons to draw from the Good wife stems from this transformation – being a sharp guy as the average Nigerian will call it or having a killer instinct. This is a very strong desire to succeed or win. It is an aggressive tenacious urge for domination in a struggle to attain a set goal. This is an important part of BUSINESS. Being a winning professional does not have to be at odds with being a good wife, a good mother and this we learn from Alicia. It is what propels her to the top. And each time she falls, she rises back still with the same tenacity.

A second lesson is demanding your worth. We learn this from Diane Lockhart, a founding partner of the firm where Alicia is an associate. She says “I want what I’m worth”. It is important that young people break up from the mentality of being grateful for very little opportunities that do not march up to their worth. It is important for everyone – except absolutely necessary – to not stoop low and accept a lower standard. This applies to relationships, work and education. The moment you start valuing yourself, everyone will not only value you but will be willing to pay your worth or treat you accordingly.

This can also be related to what Kalinda Sharma, an investigator in the series for 6 seasons says. She says, “you’re a good lawyer but you’re always waiting for people to give you things”. Whether you’re a teacher, lawyer, doctor, writer, as a professional that knows her worth, you should not be waiting for people to hand things to you. If you know your worth as did fictional character Kalinda, you will demand to be treated right when you’re not. Kalinda knew she was a brilliant investigator, so if she felt her salary was inadequate or she did not like the way things were done in the company, she spoke up. In other words, be assertive where you can manage to be. Alicia was assertive. She also knew her worth. Hence, she left the firm she started with despite the fact that her lover was there and she had just become a partner, to join a start-up firm.

Another important lesson nobody can miss from The Good wife is, dressing smart. It is important to always look good and smart on the job. The series low-key offered lots of fashion tips to working class individuals, especially women. Alicia Florrick and Diane Lockhart were always so well dressed in zip front peplum jackets, pencil skirts, pants, pumps that had an executive look to it. This does not come as a surprise as the three times Emmy nominated costume designer, Daniel Lawson handled their dressing.

According to Wall Street Journal, executive women need a full range of social clothes from smart suits to dressy casual emblems for weekend travels. Clothes are an important part of our identity.

Author: Ope Adedeji