Photo Source: Lifehack.org

Photo Source: Lifehack.org

Every great writer attests to the fact that to make a good writer, you have to be well read. To people who don’t understand the reason behind this, I’ll like to say there are a lot you stand to benefit from reading others works.

You learn to be open to imagination – especially if you read wide. When an author in his book, has described a scene in Venice, it is almost impossible to not open your mind to visually translating that scene in your mind. That in turn helps you when you write your own work, especially for works of fiction.

You learn how to write – you learn style, grammar, voice, mechanics, character development and plot direction from reading. It is like going to school, only this time, the books are your teachers. You find ways other writers have been able to execute the elements in writing and guess what? You have an opportunity to execute in better ways.

You gain knowledge reservoirs: I could write a story about a place I have never been to. Like me, a Nigerian, can write a story set in India because I have read a story or stories set in India. This is where writers are advised to read diverse materials – that are of course relevant to you. You can have ideas for a great setting just by being a frequent reader of articles by national geographic travel writers.

You are open to other concepts, which will in turn favour you a big deal in writing.

You learn new words – this might seem little but it is the singular most important thing I have come to notice writers learn from reading. You learn words and the context they can be used. This seems the most important because evidently, writing involves conjuring of words.

 

Author: Cerebral Lemon